Monthly Archives: March 2018

The Grocery Store Challenge

Grocery store aisle.

About 10 years ago just, after I finished my coursework in nutrition, I started giving classes on How to Navigate the Grocery store. Soon after you could find loads of articles on-line and in magazines on how to tackle the massive grocery stores and find only the best quality whole foods, ideal for your health. The rules were simple, shop the perimeter, that is where you will find produce, seafood and meat and dairy (though if you have read any Optimal Kitchen blogs before you know I am a bit anti-dairy). Once you have stocked up on those whole foods do a quick check of the organic section for any dry goods you may need and your ready for the check out.
We should have known that once us nutritionists starting talking about the hidden dangers lurking within those aisles, that the supermarket companies would devise some kind of plan to get us back in there. Alas one of my local grocery stores has fallen victim to this type of deceptive marketing and this past month has completely rearranged the store and removed my beloved organic/health food section. Of course I was the obnoxious customer who asked why in god’s name they thought this new layout was beneficial to anyone. Keep in mind I had just spent 20 minutes looking for my organic tamari which I buy regularly. I was told they decided to co-mingle the organics with their conventional counterparts so that shoppers could do price comparisons and be more informed shoppers. Sounds good, right. Well, if that was the case why wasn’t the tamari in the Asian section next to all the other soy sauce products? If you can believe I found it next to the barbecue sauce, the only explanation I could muster was that they thought tamari was akin to terriyaki sauce and belonged with the marinades and bbq sauces!
All I can conclude from this absurd re-organization is that customers where getting too smart, and those looking to improve their health through the foods they eat were avoiding those center aisles, chock full of all sorts of unhealthy goods. But why would the store want customers to load up on those unhealthy processed foods, what difference does it make to them if you only buy produce and other whole food products? It is quite simple really, the mark-up on those processed goods is far greater than that of fresh fruit, vegetables, meats, eggs and even dairy. It is in the store’s best economic interest to get you in those middle aisles shopping so they will do all they can to drive you there. This is not meant to demonize grocery stores, which are a big part of any community’s economy, but it is meant to inform you that you these practices exist and why they do. Ideally we would all be getting the majority of our food from local farmer’s markets or co-ops but that is simply not realistic. Instead I urge you to try and shop at smaller, locally owned grocery stores that don’t decide to re-arrange the store every year simply to keep customers wandering the aisles, eyes glazed over simply throwing things into their cart because they are unable to find the goods they really want and need.
Where we choose to spend our money will have a great impact on how stores operate. If you decide to no longer frequent those mega grocery chains, even though it might save you some money and instead shop at your local farmer’s market and specialty stores, we might just change how these stores operate. Knowing who and where your food comes from is definitely worth the extra cost. And remember when you support local stores you support your community not some corporation.

 

 

Climate Change and How we Eat

The double whammy of Nor’easters this week should convince almost anyone of the perils of climate change.  My favorite beach clam shack will be demolished after 60 plus years because this latest storm eroded away 40 feet of the protective due, virtually cantilevering the building over the beach.  Now I am not hear to argue about climate change, but I can tell you that how you eat has a profound effect on the environment and thus the climate.

Here is a simple statistic almost anyone can understand.

How much water to we need to grow:

1lb of Most Vegetables: 20-40 gallons

1lb Grains: 200-400 gallons

1lb Meat: 1300-1500 gallons.

But it doesn’t end there.  Animal production in the Agricultural industry has surpassed transportation as the greatest source of Greenhouse gases, primarily methane.  This is caused by a double whammy of more cows being raised for a meat hungry culture and forests being clear cut to create pasture land.  As a result we have less trees that are nature’s way of capturing excess greenhouse gases.  So what does all this mean.

It is simple we need to eat more vegetables and fruits, which put much less strain on the environment, and are certainly better for our health than meat.  I would encourage anyone reading this to try and shift towards a vegan diet as much as possible, but as a realist I know a complete vegan diet for most is not going to happen. Aim for a vegan meal per day or be a vegan just a few days a week.  Visit the Optimal Kitchen.com for vegan recipes that will help you embrace a plant based life style.  Your body and the planet will thank you for it!